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Booklets you may be given explaining side effects of your treatmentRadiation Treatment is likely to give you some side effects. Your treatment team will talk to you about what these side effects are likely to be before you start treatment. Your side effects will depend on:

  • The amount of radiation you are being given
  • The area of your body being treated
  • You individual response
  • The type of radiation you receive
  • Other treatment you are having (for example chemotherapy)

Acute side effects are caused by the inflammation created by radiation passing through normal tissue. These side effects develop during the course of treatment, and are most noticeable a week to ten days after your treatment has finished. Most side effects will be greatly reduced around four to six weeks after treatment has finished.

Chronic or late side effects may develop months and sometimes years later.

Your treatment will be carefully planned to minimise both acute and chronic side effects but some side effects still happen.

What are you having treated?

Side effects femaleSide effects male

HeadLymphMouthChestAbdomenPelvisBreast HeadMouth, neck and throatChestAbdomenBreast chestwallLymphMale PelvisProstate or prostate bed

Last updated 23 October 2020.